Balance:

Coordination:

Dizziness:

Exteroception:
Perception of the outside world; through eyes, ears, nose, skin

Haptic Perception:
Edges, curves, textures, forces, vibrations, motions

Interoception:
Perception of internal sensation (pain, hunger, movement of internal organs)

Joint Position Sense (JPS):

Joint Stability:

Kinaesthetics: The study of body motion, and of the perception (both conscious and unconscious) of one’s own body motions.[1] The perception of continuous movement (kinesthesia) is largely unconscious. A conscious proprioception is achieved through increased awareness. Kinaesthetics involves the teaching and personal development of such awareness.

Kinesthesia: ( also called movement threshold, and called joint motion detection), awareness of position and movement of parts of body through use of proprioceptors Behavioral – use of proprioceptors. Muscle memory. Hand-eye coordination. Focuses on body position and movements of body parts, exclusive of equilibrium/balance

Kinesthetic Awareness:

Neural Pathways:

Neuroplasticity:

Physical Stability:

Post Diagnosis:  

Postural Control:

Prehabilitation:

Pre-surgery:

Proprioception:
Perception of movement, and balance, from muscle, tendon and articular sources (joints) Physiologic feedback mechanism. Literally “one’s own perception”. Cognitive – awareness of propriocepters “The sense of the relative position of neighboring parts of the body and the strength of effort being employed in movement.” (Mosby’s Medical, Nursing and Allied Health Dictionary, 4th ed) Coordination and balance training (often designated as proprioceptive training)

Proprioceptive Awareness:

Psychological Resilience:

Rehabilitation:

Sensory Receptors: cover the skin and epithelia, skeletal muscles, bones and joints, internal organs, and the cardiovascular system.

Stress:

Tinnitus: Ringing in the ears

Vertigo:

Vestibulo-ocular Reflex:

Vestibulo-spinal Reflex:

Vestibulopathy:

Vestibular Input:

 

 

Follow by Email
Twitter
Visit Us
Follow Me
Instagram